The Managing a Gallery 101 Hawkfield Gallery Consultants Review

Many people, in general, do not have a working knowledge of what an art gallery is and how it operates. Here is an overview of what an art gallery is all about.

An art gallery essentially “houses” (whether directly or indirectly) art works and other materials which have artistic, cultural or historical value, such as relics, ancient manuscripts, archeological artifacts and jewelries. That is, a gallery can exhibit actual valuable materials for display to those who have the capacity and intention to purchase them or it may provide assistance, through its fine arts consultants, toward acquiring art works not yet in their possession. Yes, they can even do the hunting for you! Especially of wild birds you wish to keep “alive” on your walls. Ordinarily, of course, buyers would not want to wait and simply go to galleries that house works they can buy on sight.

Some of the art works are not directly owned by the gallery but consigned to them by their owners. This means they have been displayed in a gallery in the hopes that they will attract buyers instead of being kept at home where they cannot be seen by as many prospective buyers as possible. Consignment is a common practice since it does not involve money upfront either by the owner or the gallery, until a buyer pays for a piece of work. In short, everyone is happy when a sell is made, especially the buyer who goes home with the art work. We can almost say that, artistically and practically, the buyer is the ultimate winner.

It is precisely for that sense of satisfaction of providing assistance to customers that Hawkfield Gallery Consultants continues to provide quality services to art buyers and collectors. The list of artists represented in the gallery is provided on the website for reference. Nevertheless, the gallery welcomes others artists and can appraise their works as well to give them an idea as to the fair market value of their works.

Those with experience in the gallery business consider evaluating art works as a delicate process not easily accomplished as it can be a quite subjective. Hawkfield’s fine arts consultants utilize comparative sales approach by using recent auction sales as basis for pricing art works. Likewise, the gallery also considers the opinion of independent consultants for appraising art work.

Hawkfield Gallery offers competitive prices as it has low overhead expenses. Through visiting antique shops and art auctions, the gallery gains insight into the quality and value of art works that they have collected and of those which they hope to acquire from many sources. This assures customers that what they see at Hawkfield Gallery are not only a broad representation of classic American art but also of guaranteed high-quality and fair price.

 

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Haws Corporation Tempered Water Nevada USA, Singapore: Trends in Emergency Eyewashes/Showers

Repost from Safety & Health article by Tracy Haas

Equipment reliability is imperative

Unlike personal protective equipment such as hard hats and steel-toe boots, emergency eyewashes and showers are not meant to be used every day. Ideally, a worker will never need one. But should an incident such as a chemical splash occur, it’s vital that emergency eyewashes and showers be ready for use.

Issues

Because emergency eyewashes and showers are not frequently used, their maintenance may not always be top of mind. “The two most common emergency shower misuses are not providing ANSI-required tepid water and failing to conduct weekly test activations to ensure the units are working,” said Ryan Pfund, senior product manager, emergency fixtures, for Menomonee Falls, WI-based Bradley Corp. Pfund recommends establishing a weekly inspection program to test your company’s eyewash and shower equipment to ensure it is working properly and providing tepid water instantaneously. “Manufacturers provide specially designed devices and materials to assist in testing,” he added.

Nuray Ebel, product manager at Sparks, NV-based Haws, echoed Pfund’s comment that ANSI Z358.1-required weekly testing – although crucial – is often neglected: “The most significant part of the weekly test is the validation that the equipment provides proper first aid to users – not just ensuring water is present.”

Keith Flamich, marketing manager for Chicago-based Guardian Equipment, notes that equipment reliability is imperative. “During incidents where emergency eyewash and shower units are activated, far too much is at stake to depend on equipment that is not properly tested and not third-party certified,” Flamich said.

What’s new

Emergency eyewashes and showers now have improved flow control and coverage, according to Pfund. “The newest models apply fluid dynamics technology that works with a pressure-regulated flow control to provide an integral and uniform flow of water directed at the affected area,” he said.

Flamich pointed to the increasing popularity of heat-traced freeze-resistant stations in cold-weather environments. “These units are manufactured with a heat-tracing cable wrapped around internal piping to prevent the freezing of standing water within the unit,” he said. “Once activated, a safety station first delivers the standing water before drawing from a tepid water supply.” However, he cautioned that these stations are commonly misunderstood, and people often believe the units are capable of heating a full 15-minute supply of water per the ANSI Z358.1 tepid water requirement. “The reality is that these units heat only the standing water contained within its internal piping prior to unit activation,” Flamich explained. “As such, there must be continuous source of tepid water supplying the heat-traced safety station (i.e., thermostatic mixing valve, tepid water loop, or instantaneous water heater) to meet the ANSI-required 15-minute tepid water flush.”

On a separate note, Ebel spoke of the benefits of using wireless alarm technology for emergency eyewashes and showers. “Wireless transmitters enable control and/or notification from remote areas where wiring or wire maintenance is not physically possible or economically feasible.”